What Is Magnesium Used For?

What Is Magnesium Used For?

Magnesium is an essential mineral for the human body, involved in the normal functioning of organs and cells. In fact, did you know it’s the fourth-most abundant mineral in the body? This nutrient is an activator for more than 600 enzymes and plays a crucial role in DNA and RNA synthesis (1).

There are plenty of magnesium-containing foods, but our dietary habits in recent decades haven’t helped us maintain this nutrient at regular levels. The good news? We now have liposomal magnesium supplements – have you heard of them? Before we get into that, we’re going to delve into this important mineral and its virtues. You’ll want to listen carefully! 

Key Ideas

  • This article covers the importance of magnesium for human bodies. It’s an essential nutrient which we cannot produce ourselves. Magnesium deficiency can result in a range of afflictions, such as heart arrhythmia or depression, among others. 
  • Dietary supplements play a critical role when we cannot otherwise consume a nutrient in sufficient amounts.

What You Need to Know About Magnesium

Magnesium (Mg) can be found in many foods. However, if your lifestyle is keeping you from getting enough, dietary supplements offer important new ways to incorporate it into your daily life. Magnesium is also an electrolyte – are you familiar with the term? In this section, we’ll answer your questions about this crucial mineral.

Magnesium is involved in the formation of bone mass. It also plays a key role in bone, cell membranes and chromosomes. (Source: Yoga: IVf7hm88zxY/ Unsplash.com)

How Is Magnesium Used in Our Bodies?

Magnesium’s function is far more important than it may seem, since this essential mineral is a cofactor for a vast number of enzymes. Among others, magnesium plays all the following roles:

  • Regulating nervous system and muscle function. 
  • Helping form all types of proteins. 
  • Affecting energy metabolism and helping maintain healthy blood sugar levels. 
  • Regulating blood pressure. 
  • Assisting in the formation of bone mass. It also plays a key role in bones, cell membranes, and chromosomes (2).

What Is Magnesium and How Much Do I Need Per Day?

Magnesium is a nutrient the body needs to stay healthy. It’s important for the immune system and for many internal processes, affecting blood sugar levels, blood pressure, bone and protein production, and muscular and nervous function. How much per day is needed? Let’s take a look at the table below (3): 

Magnesium RDA (Recommended Dietary Allowance) 
Development StageAgeWomen (mg/day)Men (mg/day)
Infant0-6 months30 (RDI*)30 (RDI)
Infant7-12 months75 (RDI)75 (RDI)
Child1-3 years8080
Child4-8 years130130
Child9-13 years240240
Adolescent14-18 years360410
Adult19-30 years310400
Adult31+ years320420
While Pregnant18 years and below400
While Pregnant19-30 years350
While Pregnant31+ years360
While Breastfeeding 18 years and below360
While Breastfeeding 19-30 years310
While Breastfeeding31+ years320

*(RDI) Recommended Daily Intake

Magnesium is also an essential electrolyte for life. An electrolyte is a mineral carrying an electrical charge which is present in blood and other bodily fluids. Although most magnesium in our body is stored in the bones, not the blood, we still need it to form our muscles, bones, teeth, and nerves. 

Which Foods are Rich in Magnesium? 

Magnesium is found naturally in dark green leafy vegetables. There are also other foods containing this macromineral, generally also vegetables, as we’ll see in this table (4): 

FoodMg per 100 grams
Sunflower seeds387
Hazelnuts and almonds (without shell)258
Soybeans240
Chickpeas, white beans, and pinto beans160
Whole wheat 147
Squid, calamari, etc.139
Chocolate 100

Medical research has confirmed that nearly two thirds of the Western world’s population does not reach the recommended daily allowance of magnesium. This deficiency could generate a wide variety of health problems (5). 

How Does Magnesium Deficiency Affect Our Health? 

For our bodies to run correctly, getting the recommended daily allowance of magnesium is fundamental. When doing so is not possible, supplements – if used according to medical recommendations – can help prevent the consequences of magnesium deficits (5): 

  • Metabolic Syndrome. This group of risk factors includes obesity, diabetes, and high blood pressure. It may lead to stroke, diabetes, or heart disease.  
  • Diabetes. In Type 2 diabetes, lower levels of magnesium are associated with a quicker loss of kidney function (5) (7).
  • Asthma. Magnesium sulphate has been shown to improve asthma symptoms in experimental treatments (5). 
  • Headache and Migraine. Multiple studies demonstrate that oral magnesium supplements reduce the frequency, duration, and intensity of migraines by 41%, compared to 15.8% for placebos (5) (6). 
  • Hyperlipidaemia. This condition refers to increased levels of fat in the bloodstream, which can translate to higher levels of cholesterol. 
  • Kidney Stones. Further research is required, but current studies have shown that magnesium reduces the risk of kidney stone formation (7) (10). 
  • Depression. A systematic review of the relationship between depression and magnesium suggests that magnesium supplements can prevent depression and may be useful as a complementary therapy (5) (8). 
  • Heart Arrhythmia. Magnesium is considered a safe and effective treatment in cases of severe atrial fibrillation (5) (9). It is also shown to be involved in healthy blood vessel and heart function.
  • Cataracts. Magnesium supplements may be of therapeutic value for preventing the appearance and progression of cataracts in conditions associated with magnesium deficiency.
Magnesium is naturally found in dark green leafy vegetables, but there are also foods that contain this macromineral, usually of vegetable origin. (Source: Winkler: GVSoYw28A8k/ Unsplash.com)

Is It True Magnesium Could Help Me Quit Smoking?

You’ve probably never thought of magnesium as a smoking suppressor, but yes, it can help reduce cigarette use. Keep in mind that tobacco addiction is more severe when under stress – and you may not have known this, but stress promotes loss of magnesium.

As such, clinical studies (11) have shown that administering magnesium for four weeks to habitual adult smokers achieved a significant reduction in the number of cigarettes smoked. Because of this, magnesium may be useful as a complementary therapy for quitting smoking. 

Are Supplements Effective at Preventing Magnesium Deficiency? What Kinds Are There? 

In most cases, magnesium supplements can benefit people suffering from deficiencies. In clinical practice, optimizing the balance of magnesium through diet and the use of supplements also appears to be a safe, useful, and well-documented therapy (12). 

Many types of magnesium supplements are out there on the market, but today we’d like to talk about liposomal formulas, a genuine medical revolution which optimizes mineral and nutrient absorption. Sundt is the brand of choice to meet your magnesium intake needs. 

How Do Liposomal Formulas Improve Magnesium Absorption? 

One of the star features of the liposomal formulas produced by Sundt is their bioavailability – in other words, the proportion of nutrients entering our body which are ready to act. Generally, greater absorption means greater bioavailability. Let’s unpack the advantages of liposomal formulas: 

  • Backed by Scientific Research. Medical research discovered long ago that liposomal formulas can be used to protect and transport substances, such as pharmaceutical drugs. However, those substances also include vital nutrients like magnesium. 
  • Built on Liposomes. The pharmaceutical industry has used liposomes for decades to improve absorption of the active ingredients. This process is referred to as “drug delivery”.
  • Increased Bioavailability. Nutritional research and medical studies corroborate that liposomes increase bioavailability up to 30 times over! 
  • Better Performance. By increasing the bioavailability of supplements, we can meet the body’s nutrient needs as efficiently as possible. As a result, the cost-benefit relationship is beyond question. 
  • Optimal Travel to the Bloodstream. Why? Because the active ingredients enter the bloodstream more quickly and in significantly larger amounts than other, traditional formulas. For example, research shows that vitamin C in liposome capsules increases vitamin C reserves more efficiently than non-liposomal formulas (13). 
What Is Magnesium Used For?
Magnesium is an essential mineral for the body, since it intervenes in the normal functioning of organs and cells. (Source: Foodism360: axDXGOF_lJY/ Unsplash.com)

Our Conclusions

Though liposomal formulas are relatively new, they have proven their effectiveness at moving active ingredients to the bloodstream. A supplement in a liposome capsule will more easily transport micronutrients, vitamins, and minerals – in this case, magnesium.

Sundt is the only brand in Spain to combine high-quality ingredients with a unique liposomal formula. To make their magnesium supplements even more effective, Sundt’s formula also incorporates zinc, selenium, chromium, and taurine. On top of all that, the product they offer you is sugar-free, gluten-free, and completely vegan. We know you’ll love it! 

If you’d like to leave a comment, we’d be delighted to talk with you. Make sure to share this article on social media so others can benefit from Sundt supplements. 

References (13)

1. Mohammed S. Razzaque. Magnesium: Are We Consuming Enough? Nutrients. 2018 Dec; 10(12) Available at:
Source

2. Rude RK, Shils ME. Magnesium. In: Shils ME, Shike M, Ross AC, Caballero B, Cousins RJ, eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 10th ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2006:223-247. Available at:
Source

3. Institute of Medicine (IOM). Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride external link disclaimer. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1997. Available at:
Source

4. J Mataix, (ed): Tablas de composición de alimentos. Universidad de Granada, 1993. Available at:
Source

5. The Importance of Magnesium in Clinical Healthcare. Gerry K. and Stephen J. Genuis. Available at:
Source

6. Peikert A., Wilimzig C., Köhne-Volland R. Prophylaxis of migraine with oral magnesium: results from a prospective, multi-center, placebo-controlled and double-blind randomized study. Cephalalgia. 1996;16(4):257–263. doi: 10.1046/j.1468-2982.1996.1604257.x.
Source

7. Pham P.-C. T., Pham P.-M. T., Pham P.-A. T., et al. Lower serum magnesium levels are associated with more rapid decline of renal function in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Clinical Nephrology. 2005;63(6):429–436. doi:
Source

8. Derom M.-L., Sayón-Orea C., Martínez-Ortega J. M., Martínez-González M. A. Magnesium and depression: a systematic review. Nutritional Neuroscience. 2013;16(5):191–206. doi: 10.1179/1476830512y.0000000044.

9. Onalan O., Crystal E., Daoulah A., Lau C., Crystal A., Lashevsky I. Meta-analysis of magnesium therapy for the acute management of rapid atrial fibrillation. The American Journal of Cardiology. 2007;99(12):1726–1732. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2007.01.057
Source

10. Ettinger B., Pak C. Y. C., Citron J. T., Thomas C., Adams-Huet B., Vangessel A. Potassium-magnesium citrate is an effective prophylaxis against recurrent calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Journal of Urology. 1997;158(6):2069–2073. doi: 10.1016/S0022-5347(01)68155-2.
Source

11. Nechifor M. Magnesium and zinc involvement in tobacco addiction. Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy. 2012;(supplement 2):1–5. doi: 10.4172/2155-6105.S2-005. Available at:
Source

12. Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy by Uwe Gröber,Joachim Schmidt and Klaus Kisters. Academy of Micronutrient Medicine, Essen 45130, Germany; Department of Internal Medicine I, St. Anna-Hospital, Herne 44649, Germany. Available at:
Source

13. Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury. Janelle L. Davis, Hunter L. Paris, Joseph W. Beals, Scott E. Binns, Gregory R. Giordano, Rebecca L. Scalzo, Melani M. Schweder, Emek Blair and Christopher Bell. Journal ListNutr Metab Insightsv.9; 2016PMC4915787. Available at:
Source

SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE
Mohammed S. Razzaque. Magnesium: Are We Consuming Enough? Nutrients. 2018 Dec; 10(12) Available at:
Go to source
SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE
Rude RK, Shils ME. Magnesium. In: Shils ME, Shike M, Ross AC, Caballero B, Cousins RJ, eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease. 10th ed. Baltimore: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2006:223-247. Available at:
Go to source
OFFICIAL WEBSITE
Institute of Medicine (IOM). Food and Nutrition Board. Dietary Reference Intakes: Calcium, Phosphorus, Magnesium, Vitamin D, and Fluoride external link disclaimer. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1997. Available at:
Go to source
OFFICIAL DOCUMENT
J Mataix, (ed): Tablas de composición de alimentos. Universidad de Granada, 1993. Available at:
Go to source
SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE
The Importance of Magnesium in Clinical Healthcare. Gerry K. and Stephen J. Genuis. Available at:
Go to source
HUMAN STUDY
Peikert A., Wilimzig C., Köhne-Volland R. Prophylaxis of migraine with oral magnesium: results from a prospective, multi-center, placebo-controlled and double-blind randomized study. Cephalalgia. 1996;16(4):257–263. doi: 10.1046/j.1468-2982.1996.1604257.x.
Go to source
HUMAN STUDY
Pham P.-C. T., Pham P.-M. T., Pham P.-A. T., et al. Lower serum magnesium levels are associated with more rapid decline of renal function in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Clinical Nephrology. 2005;63(6):429–436. doi:
Go to source
SYSTEMATIC REVIEW
Derom M.-L., Sayón-Orea C., Martínez-Ortega J. M., Martínez-González M. A. Magnesium and depression: a systematic review. Nutritional Neuroscience. 2013;16(5):191–206. doi: 10.1179/1476830512y.0000000044.
SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE
Onalan O., Crystal E., Daoulah A., Lau C., Crystal A., Lashevsky I. Meta-analysis of magnesium therapy for the acute management of rapid atrial fibrillation. The American Journal of Cardiology. 2007;99(12):1726–1732. doi: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2007.01.057
Go to source
SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE
Ettinger B., Pak C. Y. C., Citron J. T., Thomas C., Adams-Huet B., Vangessel A. Potassium-magnesium citrate is an effective prophylaxis against recurrent calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis. Journal of Urology. 1997;158(6):2069–2073. doi: 10.1016/S0022-5347(01)68155-2.
Go to source
SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE
Nechifor M. Magnesium and zinc involvement in tobacco addiction. Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy. 2012;(supplement 2):1–5. doi: 10.4172/2155-6105.S2-005. Available at:
Go to source
SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE
Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy by Uwe Gröber,Joachim Schmidt and Klaus Kisters. Academy of Micronutrient Medicine, Essen 45130, Germany; Department of Internal Medicine I, St. Anna-Hospital, Herne 44649, Germany. Available at:
Go to source
SCIENTIFIC ARTICLE
Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury. Janelle L. Davis, Hunter L. Paris, Joseph W. Beals, Scott E. Binns, Gregory R. Giordano, Rebecca L. Scalzo, Melani M. Schweder, Emek Blair and Christopher Bell. Journal ListNutr Metab Insightsv.9; 2016PMC4915787. Available at:
Go to source
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