The Properties of Vitamin E: What Are Its Benefits?

redhead girl happy

Did you know that vitamin E was not discovered until 1922? (1) It wasn’t that long ago, was it? Since then, studies have led to the discovery of its healthy properties, some of which are remarkable. These include the ability to slow down premature cellular ageing and to improve the immune system.

That said, the property that most stands out is its antioxidant action (2). In other words, vitamin E can protect your body from free radicals, harmful molecules found in urban pollution. Throughout our article, we will discuss the properties and benefits of vitamin E. Let’s get started!

Key Facts

  • One of the great benefits of vitamin E is its ability to protect the immune system. That is why it is so important to get it, whether through diet or supplements.
  • If you choose to supplement, make sure you buy vitamin E supplements that contain a safe dose. In that regard, Sundt Nutrition‘s liposomal supplements are ideal.  
  • Our supplements feature the latest scientific technologies so you won’t need to adopt a very strict diet. You’ll love them!

What Are the Benefits of Vitamin E?

Would you like to have peachy skin and a stronger immune system to fight viruses and infections? These are just a few of the properties of vitamin E or tocopherol, some of which have yet to be discovered. Keep reading to find out just how wonderful this nutrient is!

It regulates your immune system

Vitamin E is a powerful fat-soluble antioxidant found in higher quantities in immune cells. Yes, the very cells that regulate your defences and make you resistant to disease and infection! This means that healthy levels of vitamin E could help you (4, 5, 6):

  • Reduce the risk of respiratory infections. The immunoregulatory role of vitamin E is linked with a lower risk of infectious diseases such as respiratory infections.
  • Control asthma. This immunoregulatory function of the nutrient also reduces the risk of allergic diseases like asthma.
  • It is particularly recommended for older people. Medical studies conducted on older people suggest that healthy levels of vitamin E can improve immune and inflammatory responses.
a happy woman in the beach
One of the great benefits of vitamin E is its ability to protect the immune system. (Source: Kasto: 57661725/ 123rf.com)

It improves your skin

Vitamin E has extraordinary benefits on your skin. While more research is needed on the role of this wonderful antioxidant in dermatology, scientific evidence suggests that (7, 8, 9):

It protects against sun damage

As an antioxidant, vitamin E can absorb energy from ultraviolet (UV) light. Consequently, it plays a significant role in photoprotection, preventing damage from UV-induced free radicals in the skin!

It prevents skin diseases

Many medical reports describe the successful use of vitamin E in the treatment of chronic inflammatory skin conditions. In thoses cases, it is often combined with other nutrients, such as vitamin D or vitamin C.

afro girl with skin care
Vitamin E has extraordinary properties for your skin. (Source: Park Street: 0_mcyfdyeda/ Unsplash.com)

It looks after your heart and arteries

Cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis (blockage of the arteries) cause heart attacks and strokes. Vitamin E reduces oxidative stress and inflammation, which are possible triggers for these conditions. To date, scientific studies have demonstrated that (19, 11):

  • Vitamin E protects the heart. Vitamin E has a cardioprotective action in some types of patients with high levels of oxidative stress. It is especially effective in the case of heart attacks, but it doesn’t have a preventive effect.
  • Vitamin E can manage hypertension. While studies have yet to be fully conclusive, higher vitamin E intake has been associated with a lower prevalence of hypertension.

It improves muscle health

Vitamin E deficiency can cause damage to nerves and muscles, leading to muscle weakness. The production of free radicals increases during intense exercise, which is why many athletes take antioxidants to combat fatigue and muscle damage. The most recent studies indicate that (4, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16):

  • You should take more vitamin E if you’re an athlete. Athletes who have a low vitamin E intake and a low-fat diet can benefit from supplementing with this nutrient.
  • The lack of vitamin E increases muscle fatigue. Low vitamin E reserves contribute to more tired muscles.
  • Vitamin E can help you if you exercise. Studies show that vitamin E supplementation may protect against inflammation, exercise-induced muscle and oxidative damage, as well as fatigue and loss of muscle strength.
  • Vitamin E prevents muscle damage. In short, avoiding vitamin E deficiency prevents oxidative and muscular damage.
holding a toy heart
Vitamin E has a cardioprotective action in some types of patients with high levels of oxidative stress. (Source: Jakkapan: 43296691/ 123rf.com)

Making the Most of Vitamin E’s Benefits

Now that you know a lot more about vitamin E, you may be wondering how you can best benefit from all its incredible properties. Well, you have to options: through diet or through Sundt Nutrition’s liposomal supplements. If you haven’t heard of them, let’s have a look now!

Foods that bring us the properties of vitamin E

If you decide to limit your vitamin E intake to your diet, you have to know which foods to eat. Here are the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA) (20, 21, 22):

  • For men: 13 milligrams (mg) per day, starting at 14 years of age;
  • For women: 11 milligrams (mg) per day, starting at 14 years of age.

The highest concentrations of vitamin E are found in healthy fats such as olive oil, but also in almonds and other nuts. In the following table, we have listed the primary sources of vitamin E:

FoodsVitamin E content (mg per 100 grams)
Wheat germ oil650
Sunflower oil56
Sunflower seeds37-38
Almonds and hazelnuts (roasted or raw)26-27
Olive oil18
Wheat/corn cereals17
Peanuts10
Soya/corn oil7
Dates, strawberries, green asparagus and white beans, butter, oily fish2

Liposomal supplements to enjoy the benefits of vitamin E

Have you ever heard of liposomal supplements? Backed up by substantial scientific evidence, these dietary products are of the highest quality. Let us introduce you to Sundt Nutrition‘s liposomal supplements and explain why you’ll love them! (23, 24)

You will get maximum bioavailability

Are you familiar with bioavailability? This is the percentage of nutrients that reach your body. In the case of Sundt Nutrition’s liposomal vitamin E supplements, you will obtain vitamin E faster and in greater quantities than with a traditional supplement. How good does this sound?

These supplements are encapsulated in liposomes

What are liposomes, you ask? They are like tiny bubbles in which vitamin E is encapsulated to travel faster and more naturally through the bloodstream. In fact, liposomes are very similar to our cells!

Do they contain sugar?

No! You will love Sundt Nutrition‘s liposomal supplements if you are diabetic, vegetarian, or a staunch defender of animal rights. These products do not contain any genetic engineering or animal ingredients. They are also suitable for gluten-intolerant people!

Our Conclusions

As you have read throughout our article, vitamin E is essential because of its antioxidant properties and its benefits for the good functioning of our body. That said, you will need to eat lots of healthy fats or dietary supplements.

It is always better to adopt a healthy and balanced diet, but a busy schedule doesn’t always allow us to do that. In that case, we recommend you to opt for Sundt Nutrition‘s liposomal vitamin E supplements. You won’t regret it!

We hope you enjoyed our article. If that’s the case, feel free to share it on your social media or leave us a comment below. Thanks a lot!

(Source of featured image: Rido: 121442126/ 123rf.com)

References (24)

1. Vitamin E: structure, properties and functions. Etsuo Niki and Kouichi Abe, CHAPTER 1: Vitamin E: Structure, Properties, and Functions, in Vitamin E: Nutritional Benefits and Chemistry, 2019, pp. 1-11 DOI: 10.1039 / 9781788016216-00001 eISBN: 978-1-78801-621 -6 Disponible online
Source

2. The European perspective on vitamin E: current knowledge and future research. Regina Brigelius-Flohé, Frank J. Kelly , Jukka T Salonen , Jiri Neuzil , Jean-Marc Zingg , Angelo Azzi. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 76, Number 4, October 2002, Pages 703–716,
Source

3. Chapter 9. Vitamin E. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Disponible online
Source

4. Vitamin E. Consumer fact sheet. National Institutes for Health (NIH). Disponible online
Source

5. Regulatory role of vitamin E in the immune system and inflammation. Erin Diane Lewis, Simin Nikbin Meydani y Dayong Wu. Disponible online
Source

6. Outlook: Should Vitamin E Recommendations For Older Adults Be Increased? Simin Nikbin Meydani , Erin Diane Lewis y Dayong Wu. Disponible online
Source

7. Vitamin E and skin health. Oregon State University. Linus Pauling Institute. Alexander J. Michels, Ph.D., and Maret G. Traber, Ph.D. Disponible online
Source

8. Vitamin E in dermatology. Mohammad Abid Keene Iffat Hassan. doi: 10.4103 / 2229-5178.185494 Disponible online
Source

9. The role of topical vitamin E in the treatment of scars: a systematic review. Volkan Tanaydin, MD, Jurek Conings, medical doctor, Masoud Malyar, BSc , René van der Hulst, MD, PhD , Berend van der Lei, MD, PhD. Magazine of Cosmetic Surgery, Volume 36, Number 8, September 2016, Pages 959–965, https://doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjw046. Disponible online
Source

10. Vitamin E in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases: the importance of an adequate selection of patients. Moshe Vardi , Nina S. Levy and Andrew P. Levy. doi: 10.1194 / jlr.R026641 Disponible online
Source

11. Cardiovascular and metabolic protection by vitamin E: a question of treatment strategy? Melanie Ziegler,Maria Wallert, Stefan Lorkowski and Karlheinz Peter. Doi: 10.3390 / antiox9100935 Disponible online
Source

12. Promotion of plasma membrane repair by vitamin E. Amber C. Howard ,Anna K. McNeil and Paul L. McNeil. Disponible online
Source

13. Low-frequency fatigue as an indicator of exercise-induced eccentric muscle injury: the role of vitamin E. Antonios Kyparos, Michalis G. Nikolaidis, Konstantina Dipla,Andreas Zafeiridis, Vassilis Paschalis, Gerasimos V. Grivas, Anastasios A. Theodorou, Maria Albani, Chrysoula Matziari, y Ioannis S. Vrabas. Disponible online
Source

14. Resistance exercise and vitamin E supplements. Yoshikazu Takanami, Hisao Iwane, Yukari Kawai and Teruichi Shimomitsu. DOI: 10.2165 / 00007256-200029020-00001. Disponible online
Source

15. Antioxidants and exercise performance: with special attention to vitamin E and C supplementation. Madalyn Riley Higgins, Azimeh Izadi 2OrcID yMojtaba Kaviani. College of Pure and Applied Sciences, College of Nutrition and Dietetics, Acadia University, Wolfville, Canada. Department of Biochemistry and Diet Therapy, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Disponible online
Source

16. Silva, LA; Pinho, CA; Silveira, PC; Tuon, T .; De Souza, CT; Dal-Pizzol, F .; Pinho, RA Supplementation with vitamin E decreases muscle and oxidative damage but not the inflammatory response induced by eccentric contraction. J. Physiol. Sci. 2010, 60, 51. Disponible online
Source

17. Effects of vitamin E on cognitive performance during aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Giorgio La Fata, Peter Weber and M. Hasan Mohajeri. Disponible online
Source

18. Vitamin E: its role in neurological function. DP Muller. doi: 10.1136 / pgmj.62.724.107 Disponible online
Source

19. Vitamin E. Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes for Health (NIH). Disponible online
Source

20. Alimentos con vitamina E. Tatiana Zanin. Nutricionista. Universidad Católica de Santos con registro profesional CRN-3 nº 15097. Disponible online
Source

21. Informe del Comité Científico de la Agencia Española de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutrición (AESAN) sobre Ingestas Nutricionales de Referencia para la población española. Disponible online
Source

22. Alimentos que destacan por su contenido en vitamina E. Fisterra, Elsevier. Atención primaria en la red. Disponible online
Source

23. Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury. Janelle L. Davis, Hunter L. Paris, Joseph W. Beals, Scott E. Binns, Gregory R. Giordano, Rebecca L. Scalzo, Melani M. Schweder, Emek Blair and Christopher Bell. Journal ListNutr Metab Insightsv.9; 2016PMC4915787. Disponible online
Source

24. Therapeutic Uses of Antioxidant Liposomes. Guest Editor (s): Subhash C. Basu and Manju Basu Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame. William L. Stone, Shyamali Mukherjee, Milton Smith and Salil K. Das. Disponible online
Source

Scientific Article
Vitamin E: structure, properties and functions. Etsuo Niki and Kouichi Abe, CHAPTER 1: Vitamin E: Structure, Properties, and Functions, in Vitamin E: Nutritional Benefits and Chemistry, 2019, pp. 1-11 DOI: 10.1039 / 9781788016216-00001 eISBN: 978-1-78801-621 -6 Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
The European perspective on vitamin E: current knowledge and future research. Regina Brigelius-Flohé, Frank J. Kelly , Jukka T Salonen , Jiri Neuzil , Jean-Marc Zingg , Angelo Azzi. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Volume 76, Number 4, October 2002, Pages 703–716,
Go to source
Scientific Article
Chapter 9. Vitamin E. The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E. Consumer fact sheet. National Institutes for Health (NIH). Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Regulatory role of vitamin E in the immune system and inflammation. Erin Diane Lewis, Simin Nikbin Meydani y Dayong Wu. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Outlook: Should Vitamin E Recommendations For Older Adults Be Increased? Simin Nikbin Meydani , Erin Diane Lewis y Dayong Wu. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E and skin health. Oregon State University. Linus Pauling Institute. Alexander J. Michels, Ph.D., and Maret G. Traber, Ph.D. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E in dermatology. Mohammad Abid Keene Iffat Hassan. doi: 10.4103 / 2229-5178.185494 Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
The role of topical vitamin E in the treatment of scars: a systematic review. Volkan Tanaydin, MD, Jurek Conings, medical doctor, Masoud Malyar, BSc , René van der Hulst, MD, PhD , Berend van der Lei, MD, PhD. Magazine of Cosmetic Surgery, Volume 36, Number 8, September 2016, Pages 959–965, https://doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjw046. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases: the importance of an adequate selection of patients. Moshe Vardi , Nina S. Levy and Andrew P. Levy. doi: 10.1194 / jlr.R026641 Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Cardiovascular and metabolic protection by vitamin E: a question of treatment strategy? Melanie Ziegler,Maria Wallert, Stefan Lorkowski and Karlheinz Peter. Doi: 10.3390 / antiox9100935 Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Promotion of plasma membrane repair by vitamin E. Amber C. Howard ,Anna K. McNeil and Paul L. McNeil. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Low-frequency fatigue as an indicator of exercise-induced eccentric muscle injury: the role of vitamin E. Antonios Kyparos, Michalis G. Nikolaidis, Konstantina Dipla,Andreas Zafeiridis, Vassilis Paschalis, Gerasimos V. Grivas, Anastasios A. Theodorou, Maria Albani, Chrysoula Matziari, y Ioannis S. Vrabas. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Resistance exercise and vitamin E supplements. Yoshikazu Takanami, Hisao Iwane, Yukari Kawai and Teruichi Shimomitsu. DOI: 10.2165 / 00007256-200029020-00001. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Antioxidants and exercise performance: with special attention to vitamin E and C supplementation. Madalyn Riley Higgins, Azimeh Izadi 2OrcID yMojtaba Kaviani. College of Pure and Applied Sciences, College of Nutrition and Dietetics, Acadia University, Wolfville, Canada. Department of Biochemistry and Diet Therapy, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Silva, LA; Pinho, CA; Silveira, PC; Tuon, T .; De Souza, CT; Dal-Pizzol, F .; Pinho, RA Supplementation with vitamin E decreases muscle and oxidative damage but not the inflammatory response induced by eccentric contraction. J. Physiol. Sci. 2010, 60, 51. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Effects of vitamin E on cognitive performance during aging and Alzheimer’s disease. Giorgio La Fata, Peter Weber and M. Hasan Mohajeri. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E: its role in neurological function. DP Muller. doi: 10.1136 / pgmj.62.724.107 Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E. Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes for Health (NIH). Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Alimentos con vitamina E. Tatiana Zanin. Nutricionista. Universidad Católica de Santos con registro profesional CRN-3 nº 15097. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Informe del Comité Científico de la Agencia Española de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutrición (AESAN) sobre Ingestas Nutricionales de Referencia para la población española. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Alimentos que destacan por su contenido en vitamina E. Fisterra, Elsevier. Atención primaria en la red. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury. Janelle L. Davis, Hunter L. Paris, Joseph W. Beals, Scott E. Binns, Gregory R. Giordano, Rebecca L. Scalzo, Melani M. Schweder, Emek Blair and Christopher Bell. Journal ListNutr Metab Insightsv.9; 2016PMC4915787. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Therapeutic Uses of Antioxidant Liposomes. Guest Editor (s): Subhash C. Basu and Manju Basu Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame. William L. Stone, Shyamali Mukherjee, Milton Smith and Salil K. Das. Disponible online
Go to source
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