Discover the Skin Benefits of Vitamin E!

Are you the kind of person to make the most of any little bit of sunshine to get your tan on? If so, you know you need to protect yourself from harmful UVA rays, as they can damage our skin. The benefits of vitamin E begin with protecting our skin from photo-ageing (1), so that’s a great start!

A powerful antioxidant, vitamin E is still very popular in academic circles where its incredible benefits in dermatology are still being researched. It not only fights against the free radicals that damage our organism, but also delays cellular ageing (2). Stay with us if you want to learn more about it!

Key Facts

  • Looking to improve your skin? Do you already feel the effects of too much tanning? If that’s the case, we recommend Sundt Nutrition‘s liposomal vitamin E supplements. You’ll love them!
  • The benefits of vitamin E are still under study by researchers, but its great antioxidant properties, which also target the skin, are beyond doubt.
  • In fact, vitamin E could improve scarring, prevent skin lesions, or delay photo-ageing. Don’t miss out and buy your own liposomal vitamin E supplements from Sundt Nutrition. You’ll see!

What Are the Benefits of Vitamin E for the Skin?

The effects of vitamin E on the skin have been studied for a long time, and we are sure you’ll be excited to hear a few of the discoveries made. Its photo-protective action is right up there, as we’ll see first, but there is much more. Sit back and pay attention – we promise you won’t regret it!

It protects your skin from the sun!

Topical or local application of vitamin E is often effective in increasing your skin’s photoprotection. Why is that? Because it forms part of the skin’s antioxidant defences and primarily protects against UV radiation and other free radicals that can come into contact with the epidermis (3, 4, 5, 6).

In addition, you should know that:

  • Your skin’s vitamin E is weakened by environmental pollutants such as ozone.
  • Topical or local vitamin E may reduce UV-induced swelling, erythema, and oedema of the skin.
  • Vitamin E + vitamin C. Products containing both vitamin C and vitamin E have been shown to be more effective in photoprotection than any antioxidant alone.
  • Vitamin E alone, however, increases photoprotection before and after exposure to the sun when applied locally.
  • Scientific studies support the inclusion of antioxidants in sunscreens and after-sun care products.
taking a sun bath
Topical or local application of vitamin E is often effective in increasing the skin’s photoprotection. (Source: Kachmar: 41460820/ 123rf.com)

It could help wounds heal!

While it is still under study, vitamin E can assist in wound healing through direct actions on tissue repair and regeneration (7, 8, 9, 10, 11).

Despite the lack of scientific consensus, vitamin E is used in cosmetics to speed up wound healing, prevent hypertrophic or large scars, and reduce itching. Regardless, the topical skin use of this nutrient is very promising. According to at least one study:

  • Preliminary analysis. After analysing changes in the wounds of patients suffering from bacterial infections following major burns.
  • Topical or local application of vitamin E. Both pain and bacterial load were reduced after the application of topical alpha-Tocopherol (vitamin E).
  • Positive results. All patients showed positive results and a decrease in infection.
  • A safe, simple, and affordable method. The findings conclude that vitamin E may represent a safe, simple, and cost-effective alternative for improving the healing of difficult wounds with local infection.

It prevents skin lesions!

The antioxidant properties of topical vitamin E have made it a popular treatment for a number of skin disorders. In fact, it is considered an anti-inflammatory agent for the skin. While its actions are still being investigated, we know today that (3, 4, 5, 12):

  • Vitamin E forms part of your skin’s defences. This nutrient is an integral element of the skin’s antioxidant defences.
  • Vitamin E protects you from free radicals. It mainly protects against ultraviolet radiation and other free radicals that can come into contact with the epidermis.
  • There is evidence of anti-inflammatory properties. Although further studies are needed, researchers have observed additional anti-inflammatory effects of topical vitamin E on the skin.

One thing is certain: vitamin E can help prevent skin lesions, such as some types of dermatitis or skin ulcers, amongst others.

applying foot cream care
Products containing both vitamin C and vitamin E have proven more effective in photoprotection than any antioxidant on its own. (Source: Belyaev: 119813426/ 123rf.com)

How to Make the Most of Vitamin E’s Properties for the Skin

Now that you know everything that vitamin E can do for your skin, we bet you want to get the most out of its properties. Well, you have two options available: through diet or supplementation. If you opt for the latter, liposomal supplements are best. Have you heard of them? Well, they’re a real wonder!

Liposomal vitamin E supplements for a glowing skin

If you’re a busy person, you probably don’t have time to follow a healthy diet every day to shine as you deserve. In that case, the best you can do is purchase a liposome supplement from Sundt Nutrition. But why liposome, you ask? Here’s how it works to help you look as healthy as ever!

What does liposomal actually mean?

Liposomes are like bubbles that look like human cells but are even smaller. Nutrients such as vitamin E are encapsulated or “packaged” in these liposomes so that their effects can reach your body faster. This is one of their great benefits, but there’s more!

What are the advantages of liposomal formulas?

These formulations originated in the medical field and have long since been applied in the field of supplementation as a result of technological advances. In the list below, we have summarised their key benefits or advantages to eliminate any doubts you may have. Pay attention! (15, 16, 17)

  • They are absorbed better than conventional supplements. In fact, scientists in the medical field even consider this type of product as intravenous therapy.
  • They are more bioavailable. What does this actually mean? Bioavailability is the percentage of nutrient that reaches your body. The more bioavailable it is, the more vitamin E your body will absorb.
  • They are more stable. We may not realise it, but off-the-shelf supplements are conditioned by the body’s processes for assimilating them. This is not the case with liposomal supplements because they are more easily integrated into the body.
  • They are suitable for vegan, diabetic, and gluten intolerant people. Yes, you read it right! In addition, they are free of any genetic engineering and animal ingredients.

Are Sundt Nutrition‘s liposomal supplements better?

We certainly think you won’t get anything better, but you have to find out for yourself. There’s no point in us telling you that Sundt Nutrition‘s liposomal vitamin E supplements are superior if you don’t check them out. In any case, remember to buy vitamin E supplements that contain a safe dose of vitamin E.

Foods that bring us the benefits of vitamin E for the skin

You can also obtain vitamin E through food, but this is not easy if you have a busy schedule your schedule. If you want to give it a go, here’s a table with the foods that are richest in vitamin E. Don’t forget to take them every day! (18, 19)

FoodsVitamin E (mg per 100 grams)
Wheat germ oil650
Sunflower oil56
Sunflower seeds37-38
Almonds and hazelnuts (roasted or raw)26-27
Olive oil18
Wheat/corn cereals17
Peanuts 10
Soya/corn oil7
Green asparagus and white beans, butter, dates, strawberries, oily fish2

To a lesser extent, you also find vitamin E in other foods like broccoli, eggs, blackberries, carrots, lettuce, or brown rice.


Our Conclusions

If you’re someone who loves to sunbathe, remember that photo-ageing is just around the corner, and there’s nothing better than vitamin E to fight it! In fact, its great antioxidant properties mean that slowing down this process is one of the primary benefits of this nutrient for your skin.

But vitamin E can also make your skin smoother, prevent skin damage, and may even help make your scars less visible! If you find it hard to follow a healthy diet, opt for Sundt Nutrition‘s liposomal vitamin E supplements. You won’t regret it!

If you liked our article, don’t forget to share it on your social media. You can also leave us a comment and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible. Thanks!

(Source of Featured Image: Melpomen: 82432300/ 123rf.com)

References(19)

  1. Antioxidants in dermatology. Varadraj V. Pai , Pankaj Shukla and Naveen Narayanshetty Kikkeri. doi: 10.4103 / 2229-5178.131127 Disponible online
  2. Vitamin E Supplementation Delays Cellular Senescence In Vitro. Giorgio La Fata, Nicole Seifert, Peter Weber, and M. Hasan Mohajeri. Disponible online
  3. Vitamin E and skin health. Oregon State University. Linus Pauling Institute. Alexander J. Michels, Ph.D., and Maret G. Traber, Ph.D. Disponible online
  4. Vitamin E in human skin: Organ-specific physiology and considerations for its use in dermatology. Jens J. Thiele, Swarna Ekanayake-Mudiyanselage. Department of Dermatology, Boston University Medical Center, 609 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118, United States. Disponible online
  5. Antioxidants in dermatology. Flavia Alvim Sant´anna Addor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/abd1806-4841.2017569. Disponible online
  6. Vitamin E inhibits UVAI induction of “light” and “dark” cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and oxidatively generated DNA damage, in keratinocytes. George J. Delinasios, Mahsa Karbaschi, Marcus S. Cooke and Antony R. Young. Disponible online
  7. Polymeric films loaded with vitamin E and aloe vera for topical application in the treatment of burns. Gabriela Garrastazu Pereira, Sílvia Stanisçuaki Guterres, Anna Giulia Balducci, Paolo Colombo y Fabio Sonvico. Disponible online
  8. Vitamin E and wound healing: an evidence-based review. Rachel Hobson. DOI: 10.1111 / iwj.12295 Disponible online
  9. The role of vitamin E in wound healing and healing. A.C. Grace. Needs. Disponible online
  10. The role of topical vitamin E in the treatment of scars: a systematic review. Volkan Tanaydin, MD, Jurek Conings, MD, Masoud Malyar, BSc, René van der Hulst, MD, PhD, Berend van der Lei, MD, PhD. Disponible online
  11. Efficacy of topical α-tocopherol acetate in treating burn infections. A. Di Lonardo, M. De Rosa, A. Graziano, C. Pascone and E. Lucattelli.
  12. Vitamin E in dermatology. Mohammad Abid Keene Iffat Hassan. doi: 10.4103 / 2229-5178.185494. Disponible online
  13. Anti-aging skin strategies. Ruta Ganceviciene, Aikaterini I. Liakou, † Athanasios Theodoridis, Evgenia Makrantonaki and Christos C. Zouboulis. Disponible online
  14. Vitamin E Supplementation Delays Cellular Senescence In Vitro. Giorgio La Fata, Nicole Seifert, Peter Weber, and M. Hasan Mohajeri. Disponible online
  15. Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury. Janelle L. Davis, Hunter L. Paris, Joseph W. Beals, Scott E. Binns, Gregory R. Giordano, Rebecca L. Scalzo, Melani M. Schweder, Emek Blair and Christopher Bell. Journal ListNutr Metab Insightsv.9; 2016PMC4915787. Disponible online
  16. Therapeutic Uses of Antioxidant Liposomes. Guest Editor (s): Subhash C. Basu and Manju Basu Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame. William L. Stone, Shyamali Mukherjee, Milton Smith and Salil K. Das. Disponible online
  17. Liposomal antioxidants to protect against oxidant-induced damage. Zacharias E. Suntres. Division of Medical Sciences, Northern Ontario College of Medicine, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada. Disponible online
  18. 21 Alimentos con vitamina E. Tatiana Zanin. Nutricionista. Universidad Católica de Santos con registro profesional CRN-3 nº 15097. Disponible online
  19. Informe del Comité Científico de la Agencia Española de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutrición (AESAN) sobre Ingestas Nutricionales de Referencia para la población española. Disponible online
Previous Does Magnesium Have Side Effects? Next Diet and Diarrhoea: What Should We Eat After?
Scientific Article
Antioxidants in dermatology. Varadraj V. Pai , Pankaj Shukla and Naveen Narayanshetty Kikkeri. doi: 10.4103 / 2229-5178.131127 Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E Supplementation Delays Cellular Senescence In Vitro. Giorgio La Fata, Nicole Seifert, Peter Weber, and M. Hasan Mohajeri. Disponible online
Go to source
Academic Article
Vitamin E and skin health. Oregon State University. Linus Pauling Institute. Alexander J. Michels, Ph.D., and Maret G. Traber, Ph.D. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E in human skin: Organ-specific physiology and considerations for its use in dermatology. Jens J. Thiele, Swarna Ekanayake-Mudiyanselage. Department of Dermatology, Boston University Medical Center, 609 Albany Street, Boston, MA 02118, United States. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Antioxidants in dermatology. Flavia Alvim Sant´anna Addor. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/abd1806-4841.2017569. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E inhibits UVAI induction of “light” and “dark” cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, and oxidatively generated DNA damage, in keratinocytes. George J. Delinasios, Mahsa Karbaschi, Marcus S. Cooke and Antony R. Young. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Polymeric films loaded with vitamin E and aloe vera for topical application in the treatment of burns. Gabriela Garrastazu Pereira, Sílvia Stanisçuaki Guterres, Anna Giulia Balducci, Paolo Colombo y Fabio Sonvico. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E and wound healing: an evidence-based review. Rachel Hobson. DOI: 10.1111 / iwj.12295 Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
The role of vitamin E in wound healing and healing. A.C. Grace. Needs. Disponible online
Go to source
Literature review
The role of topical vitamin E in the treatment of scars: a systematic review. Volkan Tanaydin, MD, Jurek Conings, MD, Masoud Malyar, BSc, René van der Hulst, MD, PhD, Berend van der Lei, MD, PhD. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Efficacy of topical α-tocopherol acetate in treating burn infections. A. Di Lonardo, M. De Rosa, A. Graziano, C. Pascone and E. Lucattelli.
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E in dermatology. Mohammad Abid Keene Iffat Hassan. doi: 10.4103 / 2229-5178.185494. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Anti-aging skin strategies. Ruta Ganceviciene, Aikaterini I. Liakou, † Athanasios Theodoridis, Evgenia Makrantonaki and Christos C. Zouboulis. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Vitamin E Supplementation Delays Cellular Senescence In Vitro. Giorgio La Fata, Nicole Seifert, Peter Weber, and M. Hasan Mohajeri. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury. Janelle L. Davis, Hunter L. Paris, Joseph W. Beals, Scott E. Binns, Gregory R. Giordano, Rebecca L. Scalzo, Melani M. Schweder, Emek Blair and Christopher Bell. Journal ListNutr Metab Insightsv.9; 2016PMC4915787. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Therapeutic Uses of Antioxidant Liposomes. Guest Editor (s): Subhash C. Basu and Manju Basu Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame. William L. Stone, Shyamali Mukherjee, Milton Smith and Salil K. Das. Disponible online
Go to source
Scientific Article
Liposomal antioxidants to protect against oxidant-induced damage. Zacharias E. Suntres. Division of Medical Sciences, Northern Ontario College of Medicine, Lakehead University, 955 Oliver Road, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada. Disponible online
Go to source
Official Grids
21 Alimentos con vitamina E. Tatiana Zanin. Nutricionista. Universidad Católica de Santos con registro profesional CRN-3 nº 15097. Disponible online
Go to source
Official Grids
Informe del Comité Científico de la Agencia Española de Seguridad Alimentaria y Nutrición (AESAN) sobre Ingestas Nutricionales de Referencia para la población española. Disponible online
Go to source