How to Increase Vitamin D

Did you know that when we refer to vitamin D, we’re really talking about multiple types of vitamins? We’ve got vitamin D3 (the “sunshine vitamin”, also found in animal products), D2 (vegetable origin), and the “active” forms of the molecule. You’ve probably read before that we need this nutrient to absorb calcium, explaining its importance to our bones. 

The truth is: vitamin D is also key to maintaining our immune system, nervous system, and muscles. How can you increase it if your doctor warns you about a deficiency? You can get this compound through your diet, but you could also spend time in the sun or try taking supplements. And I’ll bet you didn’t know that vitamin D now exists in liposomal form. You don’t know what liposomes are? Well, keep reading!

Key Ideas

  • Vitamin D is essential for helping bones absorb calcium, among many other benefits. To increase how much of it you absorb, you can try changing your diet, spending time in the sun, and taking supplements. 
  • The issue is that sun exposure accelerates skin aging, and very few foods in our diet contain vitamin D. The good news? Technology has brought about a genuine revolution: liposomal supplements! 
  • Liposomal formulas are validated by the scientific community, but that’s not all. They also reach the bloodstream far more rapidly. We suggest Sundt Nutrition supplements – once you try them out, you won’t want any other!

Advice on Increasing Your Vitamin D 

Has your doctor told you that your vitamin D levels are low? They’ve probably suggested ways to increase them: diet, sunshine, supplements. But what exactly should you eat, and what type of supplement is most effective? Never fear; we’re here to explain it all! 

The foods with the highest amounts of vitamin D include fatty fish and cod liver oil. (Source: Blackwell: przzdqzzkpk/ Unsplash.com)

Idea #1: Diet

Vitamin D dietary intake nowadays is, on average, far below recommended levels. This is due to the fact that very few food sources which are naturally high in vitamin D exist (1). The foods with the most vitamin D include fatty fish and cod liver oil. Take a look at this table: (2, 3)!

Food Vitamin D Per 100 Grams  Grams Per Serving Vitamin D Per Serving
Cod Liver Oil

210 mcg (8400 IU)

10 21 mcg (840 IU)
Eels 110 mcg (4400 IU) 75 82 mcg (3280 IU)
Tuna 25 mcg (1000 IU) 150 37 mcg (1480 IU)
Canned/Preserved Tuna, Albacore, Mackerel, Etc. 20 mcg (800 IU) 80 16 mcg (640 IU)
Royal Jelly 20 mcg (800 IU) 10 2 mcg (80 IU)
Smoked Salmon 20 mcg (800 IU) 100 20 mcg (800 IU)
Prawns 18 mcg (720 IU) 175 31.5 mcg (1260 IU)
Mustard 10 mcg (400 IU) 5 0.5 mcg (20 IU)

mcg: micrograms, IU: International Units

Idea #2: Sunshine

Did you know that your body naturally produces vitamin D when exposed to sunlight? It seems like the ideal way, doesn’t it? If only things were so simple! Whether or not you’ve thought about it, continued exposure to the sun speeds up cellular aging and also makes you more susceptible to cancer. Consider the following facts: 

  • Ultraviolet (UV) Radiation. Ultraviolet radiation is essential for our bodies because it promotes vitamin D production. However, UV rays penetrate the deepest layers of our skin. As a result, our skin gradually loses elasticity and begins to wrinkle. In other words, large doses of UV cause premature aging (4).
  • Summertime. During the summer, five to fifteen minutes of sun exposure per day suffice to reach recommended vitamin D levels. Beyond that time limit, you should be using sunscreen (4). Incidentally, getting sunshine through a glass surface or window is not effective.
  • The Sunscreen Problem. According to some studies, sunscreen may reduce the skin’s ability to produce vitamin D. (However, according to other experts, this decrease in production may be less than expected.) In any case, we still can’t neglect the sunscreen if we’re going to spend time in the sun. Your skin will thank you (5)!
  • Vitamin D Reducing with Age. Experts’ studies have also indicated that the skin’s production of vitamin D from solar UV rays decreases with age. This is due to lifestyle change factors, such as wearing more clothing and spending less time outdoors (5).
  • Pollution’s Effect on Vitamin D. Air pollution leads to increased ozone and nitrogen dioxide levels, which absorb UV rays. Consequently, pollution is a risk factor for hypovitaminosis and vitamin D deficiency (5)
Our bodies are able to synthesize most of the vitamin D we need through exposure to sunlight. (Source: Blackeye: r5rvlqz8hg8/ Unsplash.com)

Idea #3: Liposomal Supplements

Did you know that taking vitamin D supplements can reduce the risk of dying from cancer by up to 16% (6)? There are many different types of vitamin D supplements out on the market, but what if we were to tell you that liposomal supplements are by far the most effective? You’d probably ask our reasons for this claim, and we’ll explain them right now.

Liposomes are a type of capsule fabricated from organic materials. Because their composition is very similar to our own cells, they provide vitamins a protective covering which improves their absorption (7). Liposomal formulas have proven their effectiveness in the pharmaceutical world, (8) and now they constitute a revolutionary change in the dietary supplement field. 

For all these reasons, we suggest Sundt Nutrition vitamin D supplements: a formula which allows truly efficient absorption of nutrients. Let’s learn more:

  • Liposomal formulas are validated by scientific research. What’s more, studies show that nutrients are more bioavailable when administered through liposomes, compared to vitamins not in liposome capsules (7).
  • Founded on liposomes. Liposomes keep the substances they transport from making direct contact with the intestinal environment, which allows them to move nutrients to the cells and tissues which need them most. They’ll reach their target ready to carry out their jobs, safe from breakdown and degradation (8).
  • More bioavailability. In other words, a higher proportion of active ingredients actually reach our bodies when we ingest them through liposomes. 
  • Cost-effective. Because Sundt’s liposomal supplements offer higher bioavailability, their cost-to-performance ratio is far superior to other types of supplements.

Why Do I Need Healthy Vitamin D Levels?

Vitamin D deficiency is common and widespread around the world. It’s associated with higher risk of cancer, infectious disease, heart disease, and death (9). For all those reasons, it’s obvious that our bodies require this nutrient, but how much do we need per day? Why is it so crucial? Take notes, because we’re about to answer those questions. 

If you want strong bones, an active immune system, and an agile mind, consider adding a vitamin D2 or D3 supplement to your diet. (Source: Redl: d3bymnz0ank/ Unsplash.com)

What Is Vitamin D and How Much Do I Need Per Day?

Vitamin D, or calciferol, is a liposoluble vitamin (meaning it’s dissolved in fat). We generally obtain it through vitamin D2 (ergocalciferol) and vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol). Also called the “sunshine vitamin”, dietary supplements offer a valid way to absorb it in addition to food.

The dietary origins of D2 are vegetable-based, while D3 comes from animals and can also be produced in our own skin when exposed to the sun. How much vitamin D do we need every day? As this table shows, it depends on your age (10):

Age Recommended Daily Intake (RDI)
Infants (0-12 months) 10 mcg (400 IU)*
Children (1-13 years) 15 mcg (600 IU)
Adolescents (14-18 years) 15 mcg (600 IU)
Adults (19-70 years) 15 mcg (600 IU)
Elderly (71 and up) 20 mcg (800 IU)
Pregnant and breastfeeding women  15 mcg (600 IU)

*The RDI is expressed in micrograms (mcg) and International Units (IU)

What Is Vitamin D Used For?

In supermarkets, you’ll typically see milk and other products fortified with this particular nutrient – but why? Is it really that difficult to obtain? Keep reading, and we’ll go over the basic functions of vitamin D in the human body.

  • Benefits our bones. Vitamin D is important for our bones’ normal growth and development, since it helps us absorb the calcium in food (11).
  • Essential for muscles. In fact, this vitamin is key to muscle movement. 
  • Necessary for the immune system. Without vitamin D, our bodies cannot combat the viruses and bacteria which cause colds, flu, and infections (12).
  • Prevents Osteoporosis. As we get older, our bones gradually lose density and become more fragile, causing a condition known as osteoporosis. If we lack enough vitamin D, our bodies won’t absorb calcium, hence its importance (10)

In case what you just read wasn’t enough, there are studies (13) which suggest that vitamin D deficiency contributes to high blood pressure and atherosclerosis (a disease which affects the arteries leading to the heart). 

Our Conclusions

Does your immune system need strengthening? Have you not managed to include enough vitamin D in your diet? Are you not getting enough sun? We suggest Sundt Nutrition’s supplements – a genuine revolution in the dietary supplement field thanks to their use of liposomal technology. Liposomes mean higher bioavailability – in other words, the amount of nutrients which reach our bodies intact.

Plus, if you have coeliac disease, you’ll have no problem whatsoever with these gluten-free supplements. That’s not all: Sundt Nutrition products are made of completely natural, sugar-free ingredients. We’re convinced that once you try our liposomal supplements, you’ll come back for more! 

If you liked this article, feel free to share it on social media so others can benefit from this information. Or leave us a comment, and we’ll get back to you right away! 

References (14)

1. Cashman K.D., Kiely M. Tackling inadequate vitamin D intakes within the population: Fortification of dairy products with vitamin D may not be enough. Endocrine. 2016;51:38–46. doi: 10.1007/s12020-015-0711-x. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
Source

2. Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.Fuentes de vitamina D.
Source

3. Alimentos que destacan por su contenido en vitamina D. Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal. Servicio Madrileño de Salud. Madrid. España..Autores: Alba Galdón, Médico Residente de Endocrinología y Nutrición;María Garriga, Licenciada en Ciencia y Tecnología de los Alimentos; Juan Chacín, Médico Residente de Endocrinología y Nutrición; Mercedes Ramírez, Diplomada en Nutrición Humana y Dietética. Clotilde Vázquez, Médico Especialista en Endocrinología y Nutrición.
Source

4. The known health effects of UV. Newsroom. WHO TEAM Environment, Climate Change and Health. World Health Organization (Organización Mundial de la Salud u OMS, en español) Publicado el 16 de octubre de 2017.
Source

5. Vitamin D for Health: A Global Perspective Arash Hossein-nezhad, Michael F. HolickMayo Clin Proc. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 Jul 1.Published in final edited form as: Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 Jul; 88(7): 720–755. Published online 2013 Jun 18. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.05.011PMCID: PMC3761874
Source

6. Asociación entre la suplementación con vitamina D y la mortalidad: revisión sistemática y metanálisis. Yu Zhang, Fang Fang, Jingjing Tang, Lu Jia, Yuning Feng, Ping Xu, Andrew Faramand BMJ. 2019; 366: l4673. Publicado en línea el 12 de agosto de 2019. Doi: 10.1136 / bmj.l4673 PMCID: PMC6689821
Source

7. Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury. Janelle L. Davis, Hunter L. Paris, Joseph W. Beals, Scott E. Binns, Gregory R. Giordano, Rebecca L. Scalzo, Melani M. Schweder, Emek Blair and Christopher Bell.  Journal ListNutr Metab Insightsv.9; 2016PMC4915787
Source

8. Liposomes for Enhanced Bioavailability of Water-Insoluble Drugs: In Vivo Evidence and Recent Approaches. Mi-Kyung Lee. Pharmaceutics. 2020 Mar; 12(3): 264. Published online 2020 Mar 13. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics12030264 PMCID: PMC7151102 ArticlePubReaderPDF–2.9MCitation
Source

9. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in malnourished inpatients and associated with higher mortality: A prospective cohort study Meret Merker, Aline Amsler, Renata Pereira, Rebekka Bolliger, Pascal Tribolet, Nina Braun, Claus Hoess, Vojtech Pavlicek, Stefan Bilz, Sarah Sigrist, Michael Brändle, Christoph Henzen, Robert Thomann, Jonas Rutishauser, Drahomir Aujesky, Nicolas Rodondi, Jaques Donzé, Zeno Stanga, Beat Mueller, Philipp Schuetz Medicine (Baltimore) 2019 Nov; 98(48): e18113. Published online 2019 Nov 27. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000018113PMCID: PMC6890327
Source

10. National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Calcium and Vitamin D: Important at Every Age.
Source

11. Vitamin D for the treatment of chronic painful conditions in adults Sebastian Straube, Sheena Derry, Carmen Straube, R Andrew Moore, Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 May; 2015(5): CD007771. Published online 2015 May 6. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD007771.pub3
Source

12. Vitamin D. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health.
Source

13. Vitamin D deficiency induces high blood pressure and accelerates atherosclerosis in mice Sherry Weng, Jennifer E. Sprague, Jisu Oh, Amy E. Riek, Kathleen Chin, Miguel García, Carlos Bernal-Mizrachi Plus one. 2013; 8 (1): e54625. Published online January 22, 2013. doi: 10.1371 / journal.pone. 0054625PMCID: PMC3551761
Source

14. Vitamin D in organ transplantation EM Stein, E. Shane. Osteoporos Int. Author's manuscript; Available from PMC on August 20, 2014. Published in final edited form as: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jul; 22 (7): 2107–2118. Published online January 5, 2011. doi: 10.1007 / s00198-010-1523-8 PMCID: PMC4139072.
Source

Scientific article
Cashman K.D., Kiely M. Tackling inadequate vitamin D intakes within the population: Fortification of dairy products with vitamin D may not be enough. Endocrine. 2016;51:38–46. doi: 10.1007/s12020-015-0711-x. [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
Go to source
Official website
Merck Sharp & Dohme Corp.Fuentes de vitamina D.
Go to source
Scientific article
Alimentos que destacan por su contenido en vitamina D. Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal. Servicio Madrileño de Salud. Madrid. España..Autores: Alba Galdón, Médico Residente de Endocrinología y Nutrición;María Garriga, Licenciada en Ciencia y Tecnología de los Alimentos; Juan Chacín, Médico Residente de Endocrinología y Nutrición; Mercedes Ramírez, Diplomada en Nutrición Humana y Dietética. Clotilde Vázquez, Médico Especialista en Endocrinología y Nutrición.
Go to source
Official website
The known health effects of UV. Newsroom. WHO TEAM Environment, Climate Change and Health. World Health Organization (Organización Mundial de la Salud u OMS, en español) Publicado el 16 de octubre de 2017.
Go to source
Scientific article
Vitamin D for Health: A Global Perspective Arash Hossein-nezhad, Michael F. HolickMayo Clin Proc. Author manuscript; available in PMC 2014 Jul 1.Published in final edited form as: Mayo Clin Proc. 2013 Jul; 88(7): 720–755. Published online 2013 Jun 18. doi: 10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.05.011PMCID: PMC3761874
Go to source
Systematic review
Asociación entre la suplementación con vitamina D y la mortalidad: revisión sistemática y metanálisis. Yu Zhang, Fang Fang, Jingjing Tang, Lu Jia, Yuning Feng, Ping Xu, Andrew Faramand BMJ. 2019; 366: l4673. Publicado en línea el 12 de agosto de 2019. Doi: 10.1136 / bmj.l4673 PMCID: PMC6689821
Go to source
Scientific article
Liposomal-encapsulated Ascorbic Acid: Influence on Vitamin C Bioavailability and Capacity to Protect Against Ischemia–Reperfusion Injury. Janelle L. Davis, Hunter L. Paris, Joseph W. Beals, Scott E. Binns, Gregory R. Giordano, Rebecca L. Scalzo, Melani M. Schweder, Emek Blair and Christopher Bell.  Journal ListNutr Metab Insightsv.9; 2016PMC4915787
Go to source
Scientific article
Liposomes for Enhanced Bioavailability of Water-Insoluble Drugs: In Vivo Evidence and Recent Approaches. Mi-Kyung Lee. Pharmaceutics. 2020 Mar; 12(3): 264. Published online 2020 Mar 13. doi: 10.3390/pharmaceutics12030264 PMCID: PMC7151102 ArticlePubReaderPDF–2.9MCitation
Go to source
Scientific article
Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in malnourished inpatients and associated with higher mortality: A prospective cohort study Meret Merker, Aline Amsler, Renata Pereira, Rebekka Bolliger, Pascal Tribolet, Nina Braun, Claus Hoess, Vojtech Pavlicek, Stefan Bilz, Sarah Sigrist, Michael Brändle, Christoph Henzen, Robert Thomann, Jonas Rutishauser, Drahomir Aujesky, Nicolas Rodondi, Jaques Donzé, Zeno Stanga, Beat Mueller, Philipp Schuetz Medicine (Baltimore) 2019 Nov; 98(48): e18113. Published online 2019 Nov 27. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000018113PMCID: PMC6890327
Go to source
Official website
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases. Calcium and Vitamin D: Important at Every Age.
Go to source
Scientific article
Vitamin D for the treatment of chronic painful conditions in adults Sebastian Straube, Sheena Derry, Carmen Straube, R Andrew Moore, Cochrane Pain, Palliative and Supportive Care Group Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2015 May; 2015(5): CD007771. Published online 2015 May 6. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD007771.pub3
Go to source
Official website
Vitamin D. U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health.
Go to source
Scientific article
Vitamin D deficiency induces high blood pressure and accelerates atherosclerosis in mice Sherry Weng, Jennifer E. Sprague, Jisu Oh, Amy E. Riek, Kathleen Chin, Miguel García, Carlos Bernal-Mizrachi Plus one. 2013; 8 (1): e54625. Published online January 22, 2013. doi: 10.1371 / journal.pone. 0054625PMCID: PMC3551761
Go to source
Scientific article
Vitamin D in organ transplantation EM Stein, E. Shane. Osteoporos Int. Author's manuscript; Available from PMC on August 20, 2014. Published in final edited form as: Osteoporos Int. 2011 Jul; 22 (7): 2107–2118. Published online January 5, 2011. doi: 10.1007 / s00198-010-1523-8 PMCID: PMC4139072.
Go to source
This entry was posted in Blog and tagged .