Why You Should Be Taking Liposomal Curcumin

Does the word curcumin sound familiar to you? If not, turmeric probably does. You may know that turmeric powder, on top of being a seasoning and food colouring, has also been used in traditional Indian medicine for centuries. The active ingredient of turmeric, or Curcuma longa, is curcumin – a molecule with several different health benefits.

What if we were to tell you that there are curcumin supplements in liposomal form which help relieve numerous symptoms? It’s big news in the health world, but do you know why? Thanks to liposomes, it’s now possible to “package” substances inside natural membranes which protect them. This eases their transport through the body, maximising the amount absorbed. The future has arrived!

Key Ideas

  • Curcumin is one of the essential components of turmeric. This pigment, in conjunction with other substances, is responsible for turmeric’s many medicinal properties.
  • There are various ways to take curcumin. Perhaps the most revolutionary is liposomal supplements. Liposomes are microscopic capsules which guarantee the delivery of a concentrated dose of curcumin.
  • Liposomal curcumin has greater bioavailability due to its liposome ‘capsules’. This lets the nutrient optimally provide its antioxidant and regenerative benefits.

Liposomal Curcumin: What You Need to Know

In the world of natural supplements, liposomal formulas have just arrived on the scene, but they’re already becoming the “new normal”. Liposomes allow us to manufacture microcapsules which boost the effectiveness of your favourite supplements. Liposomal curcumin is a fantastic example, and we’ll explain why if you keep reading and come along for the ride!

According to some consumers, particularly athletes, curcumin can provide a subjective feeling of wellbeing. Some find it improves their mood and relieves aches and pains after an intense workout. (Source: Rido: 123419414/ 123rf.com)

What Is Liposomal Curcumin?

Curcumin is a polyphenol, or antioxidant compound, derived from turmeric. The plant it’s extracted from lends it its orange-yellow colour. When we talk about liposomal curcumin, we’re referring to its microcapsule format. The nutrient is enveloped in a protective layer of lipids (organic substances similar to our own cell membranes) which serve as protection and transport through the body.

Liposomes are small, spherical structures made up of organic materials. Putting a liposomal covering over curcumin allows the body to absorb the compound and transport it through the blood in greater amounts. In other words, it prevents nutrients from being metabolised and discarded before they can carry out their therapeutic effects.

What Are Liposomal Curcumin’s Health Benefits?

Curcumin, and more specifically liposomal curcumin supplements, have been shown to have various effects. The standouts, however, are its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. We’ve compiled a summary of some of curcumin’s most meaningful benefits. If you’ve never tried a supplement of this magnificent compound, what are you waiting for (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7)?

  • Anti-Inflammatory Effects: Curcumin has anti-inflammatory properties. In fact, some studies have found it to be equally potent and effective as certain medications – and with fewer side effects. How does it work? According to the data currently available, curcumin may be able to fight inflammation at the molecular level.
  • Antioxidant Effects: Curcumin’s chemical structure makes it a substance with antioxidant properties. This means it can oppose the effects of free radicals, particles related to premature aging and multiple illnesses.
  • Cognitive Effects: Curcumin’s potential usefulness for all sorts of brain-related conditions is currently under study. These conditions include depression and Alzheimer’s disease. Who knows if this amazing substance could help us in future fights against these illnesses!
  • Cardiovascular Effects: Curcumin may have protective effects on the heart and blood vessels, and may even be capable of lowering cholesterol levels. These promising benefits are currently under study by reputable experts.
  • General Wellness: According to some consumers, particularly athletes, curcumin can provide a subjective feeling of wellbeing. Some find it improves their mood and relieves aches and pains after an intense workout.
Liposomes are small, spherical structures made up of organic materials. (Source: Larkjit: 47729403/ 123rf.com)

How Is Liposomal Curcumin Different – And Why Is It Better?

Liposomal curcumin supplements are distinguished from others by their encapsulating technology. In this process, curcumin joins with or is integrated into liposome bubbles. This creates products with an important set of advantages:

  1. Greater bioavailability. This refers to the amount of curcumin which enters our bodies intact and ready to provide its benefits.
  2. Greater absorption thanks to the similarity between liposomes and our own cell membranes.
  3. Liposome protection and “packaging”. This can prevent curcumin from breaking down before it can carry out its functions.
  4. The highest-quality ingredients are used for this type of liposomal capsule, with no unneeded additives.
  5. Certified vegan, sugar-free, and gluten-free. Great news for many!
  6. The manufacturing process includes no animal products and no genetically modified ingredients.

What’s the Recommended Dosage for Liposomal Curcumin Supplements?

In general, the recommended dosage of a liposomal curcumin supplement will depend on various factors. These may include your physical condition or certain lifestyle habits. In most cases, the standard recommendation is to take 5 ml of curcumin twice a day. Mix the supplement into a large glass of water or juice and drink it about 15 minutes before eating.

Does Liposomal Curcumin Have Side Effects?

To date, not many studies have found that curcumin causes side effects (at least when taken on its own, not combined with other ingredients). However, some people have experienced indigestion, nausea, dizziness, or diarrhoea.

As with all supplements, the best route is to follow daily recommended dosage. If you experience any unusual or uncommon symptoms, the safest option is to quickly check with a doctor you trust.

Liposomal curcumin has greater bioavailability thanks to its capsule form. (Source: Nikcoa: 151366946/ 123rf.com)

How Should Liposomal Curcumin Supplements Be Stored?

The suggestions on how to store liposomal curcumin are fairly standard for this type of supplement. Ideally, you should keep them in a cool, dry place. Once opened, they are best kept in the refrigerator and consumed within two months. Shake well before using and, of course, keep supplements out of children’s reach.

Are There People Who Should Avoid Liposomal Curcumin?

Of course there are! In spite of curcumin’s various positive health effects, it’s not appropriate for every person in every situation. People with certain conditions are best off completely avoiding curcumin in any form. These groups include (8, 9, 10):

  • Pregnant or Breastfeeding Women: Because we lack sufficient studies to determine whether curcumin supplements are safe for pregnant or breastfeeding women, the best bet currently is to avoid them just in case.
  • Gallbladder Disease: Curcumin can cause the gallbladder to contract, which may worsen this illness’s symptoms.
  • Kidney Stones: Some studies show that curcumin has high oxalate content. Oxalate can join with calcium and cause kidney stones to form.
  • Diabetes: Curcumin could lower your blood sugar levels excessively.
  • Acid Reflux: If you suffer from heartburn, acid reflux, or similar problems, curcumin could aggravate those symptoms.
  • Cancer and Other Serious Conditions: Curcumin supplements could possibly interfere with the effects of cancer treatments such as chemotherapy, as well as any other drug used to treat severe illness. If this applies to you, avoid taking supplements without your doctor’s express permission.
  • Anaemia: Curcumin could block proper iron absorption, aggravating anaemia symptoms due to the lack of this mineral.
  • Blood Clotting Problems: If you’ve been diagnosed with a blood-related condition (excessive bleeding, excessive blood clotting, or problems stopping blood flow), do not use curcumin without medical supervision.
  • Recent or Upcoming Surgery: Curcumin may cause increased bleeding during or after surgery. As such, if you’re scheduled to undergo any procedures (including dental surgery), stop taking curcumin at least two weeks beforehand. Ask your doctor or the specialist who performed your operation to help you decide when you can resume taking curcumin.
  • Regular Medication Use, Especially Anticoagulant Medications: Curcumin could affect your regular medications (especially drugs such as sintrom), causing them to have weaker or stronger effects than expected.

Our Conclusions

Curcumin is an astonishing supplement, and we’re still discovering all it has to offer. In liposomal form, its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects can be maximised even further.

Because liposomes are made of phospholipids, substances similar to our own cell membranes, they provide a covering around curcumin. This lets the nutrient optimally realise its magnificent effects, so long appreciated in India’s traditional medicine. Would you like to know more about liposomal curcumin? Visit our website or leave us a comment! Take a step towards bettering your own health – give this supplement a try. If you found this article interesting, feel free to share it on social media.

References(10)

  1. Jurenk, J. Anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin, a major constituent of Curcuma longa: a review of preclinical and clinical research. 2009
  2. Venugopal P., Adluri Ram S. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin. 2007
  3. Rakhi A., Sudhir K. G., Jai Raj B. Detoxification and antioxidant effects of curcumin in rats experimentally exposed to mercury. 2010
  4. Xu Y., Ku B. Curcumin reverses the effects of chronic stress on behavior, the HPA axis, BDNF expression and phosphorylation of CREB. 2006
  5. Dong S., Zeng Q., et al. Curcumin Enhances Neurogenesis and Cognition in Aged Rats: Implications for Transcriptional Interactions Related to Growth and Synaptic Plasticity. 2012
  6. Wanwarang W., Phrommintikul A. The protective role of curcumin in cardiovascular diseases. 2009
  7. Toborek M., Kaiser S. Endothelial cell functions. Relationship to atherogenesis. 1999
  8. Rasyid A., Jaalam K., Lelo A. Effect of different curcumin dosages on human gall bladder. 2002
  9. Tang M., Larson-Meyer E., Liebman M. Effect of cinnamon and turmeric on urinary oxalate excretion, plasma lipids, and plasma glucose in healthy subjects. 2008
  10. Neerati P., Devde R., Kumar A. Evaluation of the effect of curcumin capsules on glyburide therapy in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. 2014
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Scientific article
Jurenk, J. Anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin, a major constituent of Curcuma longa: a review of preclinical and clinical research. 2009
Go to source
Scientific article
Venugopal P., Adluri Ram S. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin. 2007
Go to source
Scientific article
Rakhi A., Sudhir K. G., Jai Raj B. Detoxification and antioxidant effects of curcumin in rats experimentally exposed to mercury. 2010
Go to source
Scientific article
Xu Y., Ku B. Curcumin reverses the effects of chronic stress on behavior, the HPA axis, BDNF expression and phosphorylation of CREB. 2006
Go to source
Scientific article
Dong S., Zeng Q., et al. Curcumin Enhances Neurogenesis and Cognition in Aged Rats: Implications for Transcriptional Interactions Related to Growth and Synaptic Plasticity. 2012
Go to source
Scientific article
Wanwarang W., Phrommintikul A. The protective role of curcumin in cardiovascular diseases. 2009
Go to source
Scientific article
Toborek M., Kaiser S. Endothelial cell functions. Relationship to atherogenesis. 1999
Go to source
Scientific article
Rasyid A., Jaalam K., Lelo A. Effect of different curcumin dosages on human gall bladder. 2002
Go to source
Scientific article
Tang M., Larson-Meyer E., Liebman M. Effect of cinnamon and turmeric on urinary oxalate excretion, plasma lipids, and plasma glucose in healthy subjects. 2008
Go to source
Scientific article
Neerati P., Devde R., Kumar A. Evaluation of the effect of curcumin capsules on glyburide therapy in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus. 2014
Go to source